FAQ's

Where is my Ad?

If you’re having trouble finding your ad, read this article to learn more.

After creating your ad, it gets sent to our internal systems. Processing times can change depending on how busy the site is at the time. If it's taking a little longer than expected, please bear with us. Once it goes live we’ll send you an email to confirm, and a link to your ad.

Checking On Your Ads

Your ads can be found in ‘Public Profile’ under My Account. If your ad is removed for any reason, you will be notified via email.

There are a few reasons why your ad might not be live:

  • Expired: Adverts posted are live for 30 days. 
  • Removed: Ads are removed from our end if we believe it breaches one or more of our posting rules. An email with more information as to why this has happened will be sent to your registered email address.
  • Needs Edits: Ads are occasionally placed in edit mode from our end. We will send you an email advising you what needs to be tweaked. Once that’s done, the advert is good to go.
  • Processing: Ads can take some time to go through our systems. The exact amount of time depends on the ad and how busy we are at the time. You'll receive an email to let you know when it's officially gone live.

Haven't received an email? Make sure to check both your inbox and spam folder.

What to Do If I’ve Been Scammed

Whether you've been defrauded by someone or you think you've discovered stolen goods, you should always contact your local police to report the incident and get a reference number. If the police take the matter further, the investigating police officer will contact us. We'll do all we can to provide the police with any information that helps their investigation.

Before you go to the police

If your item hasn't arrived, it may not be a case of fraud or stolen goods. It could be that you're just dealing with a seller who is slow to send an item or keep in contact. In either of these cases, please try contacting the seller directly one more time to resolve your problem.

Is it a crime?

If you report your case to the police, they'll decide if it should be investigated as a crime or civil dispute. If the police feel that your case doesn't involve a criminal intent by the other party, they may advise you to take your own civil action to recover your losses. This is done through a local court or tribunal, which deals with small claims. For this, you'll need to know the name and address of the other party. A police officer will be able to help you with this process.

How do I make a police report?

The simplest way is to go to your local police station or call the local police operator on a non-emergency number. In most cases, your report can be taken by telephone and followed up later. To report fraud and cybercrime, you can also file a report online through Action Fraud.

What evidence do I need?

The police may need these from you:

  • Essential details such as the nature, date and time of the offence
  • The name and contact details of the victim and suspect(s)
  • Any email exchanges between you and other person
  • If relevant, the Ad reference number or a printed copy of the Ad on Spares or Repair

If you decide to report a fraud to the Police, please get them to contact us. The majority of the police have our direct email and if they don't, ask them to contact us through the Help Desk. Spares or Repair is happy to help the police in their investigations once you've reported it.

Secrets of creating a great ad?
 
Your ad will work best when you make choosing and buying easy and hassle-free. So be accurate with your location and description. Be honest about the good points and the bad, and ask a fair price that reflects the condition of your item.
 
And it’s got to look great. Take some time to make your item clean and tidy. Shoot some top photos, in good light, so buyers can see exactly what they’re getting.

Avoiding Scammers

Our guide to spotting phishing scams and keeping your information safe.

16-Nov-2018Generic
Description

Technology now plays a big part in all of our lives. Most of the time it’s a positive, but occasionally fraudsters use it to try to scam others through a method known as ‘phishing’.

What’s phishing?

Phishing is when somebody emails, texts or calls another person pretending to be a reputable company. In reality, they’re a scammer and they’re trying to steal personal details. They're often after passwords, banking information, or personal identification.

What does phishing look like?

Fraudsters go to great lengths to mimic real companies. They can use logos, similar email addresses and even the names of employees to appear more realistic. Learning to spot phishing attempts comes down to recognizing when you are dealing with the real organization, and when it may be a fake. Below are a few telling signs that it's a phishing attempt.

Signs of phishing websites:

  • Alarmist or exciting statements. In order to get others to act quickly, they'll often claim that you must login or make a payment quickly before your ad is deleted or account closed. Alternatively, they may claim that you've won a contest that you haven't entered. Legitimate companies don’t do this.
  • Asking immediately for personal information. Phishing sites will bring up a web form asking for your personal information right away. Don’t confirm card details, account names or passwords unless you’re sure it’s the real website. Spares or Repair pages will always be on sparesrepair.co.uk. Look for the padlock in the address bar before you enter your details. If you’re not sure, don’t share. Tip: If you're really not sure it's the real site, close the link and find the company's website through a google search. It should look the same. 
  • Small details don't seem right. Phishing websites are often made in a hurry, so they'll miss small details like spelling mistakes, name changes and proper formatting. 
  • The site is blocked by your web browser or anti-virus software. Fake websites often contain malicious software (malware). It lets scammers tamper with your computer and sometimes steal personal information.

Signs of phishing emails:

  • Alarmist or exciting statements. In order to get others to act quickly, they'll often claim that you must login or make a payment quickly before your ad is deleted or account closed. Alternatively, they may claim that you've won a contest that you haven't entered. Legitimate companies don’t do this.
  • Non-specific names. Real companies will almost always address you by the name you used to register for their site. If an email starts off with a generic introduction like "Dear User" or "Dear Spares or Repair Customer", while also asking for your immediate action, be cautious.
  • Bad spelling and grammar. Many phishing attempts come from overseas, and often use odd phrasing, incorrect spelling or bad grammar.
  • Odd email addresses. They’ll often look a bit different to the real thing, or contain mistakes. An email from xxxx@sparesrepair.co.uk doesn't prove that it’s from us.
  • Requesting your pins or passwords. If they're trying to gain access to your Spares or Repair account, they may ask that you provide your password within the email. Spares or Repair will never ask for your password in an email. If they're trying to gain access to banking details, they'll ask you to provide your bank name or account number with a PIN or your account password via email. Banks don’t operate like this.

Signs of phishing phone calls:

  • Asking to confirm your account details. Fraudsters will call you out of the blue and ask you to confirm personal details, passwords or bank details. Legitimate companies won’t do this.
  • Instructions to login to a very specific site. Rather than just telling you to go onto their site by the usual method, they'll provide instructions to visit and log into ‘your’ account immediately. Details will usually lead to a fake website.
  • Immediate payment requests. People who ask you to pay for something over the phone. Don’t share any of your bank or card details.
  • Automated messages asking you to call back. Fraudsters will often use automated calls or messages where you’re asked to call a specific number back. These are often on 084, 087 or 09 numbers and you could be kept on hold to run up a large bill. Don’t call back.

Signs of phishing text messages:

  • Asking to confirm your account details. Fraudsters will text you out of the blue and ask you to confirm personal details, passwords or bank details. Legitimate companies won’t do this. If you get one, forward it to your network provider using 7726, or delete it.
  • Suspicious links within the text. Fraudsters will often send phishing websites through text. If you don't recognize the URL or it looks suspicious, don't click it. If it's a legitimate text from a company, you should still be able to access any promotions or information if you visit their site independently of the link in a text. 
  • Strange-looking replies to ‘for sale’ ads. These are another way to fool you into clicking on fake links or replying to fake email addresses.
  • Alarmist or exciting statements. In order to get others to act quickly, they'll often claim that you must login or make a payment quickly before your ad is deleted or account closed. Alternatively, they may claim that you've won a contest that you haven't entered. Legitimate companies don’t do this.
  • Non-specific names. Real companies will almost always address you by the name you used to register for their site. If an email starts off with a generic introduction like "Dear User" or "Dear Spares or Repair Customer", while also asking for your immediate action, be cautious.
  • Bad spelling and grammar. Many phishing attempts come from overseas, and often use odd phrasing, incorrect spelling or bad grammar.

What should I do if I receive a phishing attempt?

  • Never follow the links and don’t share personal information. Always go to websites directly, using your browser. If in doubt, call the company or bank to find out what’s going on.
  • Report the phishing attempt through Action Fraud's website

How can I protect myself?

  • Protect your computer with the latest version of your web browser and use an anti-virus program.
  • Never let your email address or passwords be publicly visible on any website.
  • Always check contact numbers and websites independently.
  • Hang up on suspicious callers.
  • Don’t open suspicious links or websites.
  • Don’t respond to suspicious texts or emails. You can forward texts to your network provider using 7726, or just delete them.
  • If you’re suspicious of a business that’s been in touch, contact them directly to check it was them.
  • Don’t pay anything if you’re told you’ve won a prize or competition.
  • Look for spelling and grammar mistakes in emails, texts and on websites.
  • Look for inaccurate brand names or company logos.
  • Check the internet for information on the latest scams. There are often online warnings, and police websites carry up-to-date information.
  • Trust your instincts. If it doesn’t ‘feel right’, it probably isn’t.
  • If you have doubts but aren't sure, check your suspicions with friends and family.

How do I know if a Spares or Repair email is genuine?

  • Emails from Spares or Repair will be sent from support@sparesrepair.co.uk. If it's from another Spares or Repair member, will be sent through our masked email system and will end in @sparesrepair.co.uk. 
  • We don’t get involved in payments or item delivery between buyers and sellers. Be very wary if someone contacts you pretending to be us and trying to get involved.
  • We won't ask for your account password, banking details, or any other potentially sensitive information over email. If you receive an email that looks like it's from us requesting this information, don't click any links in the email.